Pain In The Foot's Arch Causes Symptoms And Treatments

posted on 23 Mar 2015 18:52 by nappypsychopath40
Overview

Plantar fasciitis refers to an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick, fibrous band running along the sole of the foot. Such inflammation results from direct injury to the plantar fascia, usually, repeated trauma to the tissue where the fascia attaches to the calcaneus or heel bone. The plantar fascia is critical in maintaining the foot?s complex arch system, also playing a role in balance and fine control of certain phases of the athlete?s gait. Injury to the plantar fascia is particularly painful and disabling for runners and can often prove stubbornly resistant to treatment. Rehabilitation is frequently a lengthy and frustrating process. For these reasons, care should be taken where possible to avoid such injury by means of preventative exercises and sensitivity to early warning signs.

Foot Arch Pain




Causes

Spending a lot of time on your feet. Especially when you are not used to doing so. For example you may have started a new job such as waiting tables where you are on your feet all day and wake up the next day with sore feet. This is a sign of damage and over time could lead to plantar fasciitis. Being Over-Weight. Never an easy topic to discuss but in simple terms, the heavier you are, the greater the burden on your feet. There are times when you're walking when your entire body weight is borne on one leg and therefore one foot, placing great strain on the plantar fascia. Wearing shoes with poor arch support or cushioning. A tight Achilles tendon. This is the big tendon at the bottom of your calf muscles above your heel. If this is excessively tight this can affect your ability to flex your ankle and make you more likely to damage your plantar fascia. Suddenly changing your exercise routine. Using running as an example if you suddenly run many more miles than your are used to or change to a new running surface e.g. grass to tarmac - these factors can put excessive strain on the plantar fascia and lead to plantar fasciitis. All of these risk factors ultimately lead to a specific change in foot structure. The term given is over-pronation and this basically describes rolling in of the foot and lowering of the arches. It is this change that excessively elongates the plantar fascia which can lead to plantar fasciitis.




Symptoms

Common symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain in the morning when you first get out of bed, pain and stiffness when you start to walk after sitting for a while, increasing arch or heel pain toward the end of the day, tired feet at the end of the day. Other causes of arch and heel pain include arthritis, infection, fractures and sprains, and even certain systemic diseases. Since there are multiple possible causes, you should see your podiatrist for a thorough evaluation if you are experiencing arch or heel pain that does not respond quickly to early treatment.




Diagnosis

In people with flat feet, the instep of the foot comes in contact with the ground when standing. To diagnose the problem, the health care provider will ask you to stand on your toes. If an arch forms,the flat foot is called flexible. You will not need any more tests or treatment. If the arch does not form with toe-standing (called rigid flat feet), or if there is pain, other tests may be needed, including a CT scan to look at the bones in the foot. MRI scan to look at the tendons in the foot. X-ray of the foot.




Non Surgical Treatment

High arches that are flexible do not require any treatment. In cases where there is pain, shoe modifications such as an arch insert or support insole can help to relieve pain during walking. Custom orthotic devices can be given that fit into the shoe and provide stability and cushioning effect. Your doctor may recommend a brace to help keep the foot and ankle stable. In severe cases, surgery is performed to flatten the foot. Any coexisting nerve disorders are also treated.

Pain In Arch




Surgical Treatment

Surgery may be necessary in situations where the symptoms are likely to get worse over time, or when pain and instability cannot be corrected with external orthopedic devices. There are many types of surgical procedures, including cavus foot reconstruction, which can be performed to correct the foot and the ankle and restore function and muscle balance.




Prevention

Drink plenty of water before, during and after your workout. Dehydration is a common cause of muscle cramps, according to MayoClinic.com. If your workouts are long and strenuous, drink a carbohydrate-based electrolyte beverage too. Warm up the muscles of your feet before you work out. A simple exercise is to write the letters of the alphabet with your toes. Perform the warm up with bare feet and exaggerate the movements to challenge your muscles. Wear properly fitted shoes. Visit a sporting goods store and get your feet and arches measured. Ask for help selecting a pair of shoes to fit your workout. For instance, if you play soccer, you need cleats, not running shoes. Take a break. Cramps can be your body's way of telling you you're exercising too much, according to MayoClinic.com. Rest for a few days, then resume exercise and see if you can complete a workout without arch cramps. Stretch. At the end of your workout, perform a few stretching exercises to keep your muscles from tightening and cramping. Sit down, lean over and grasp your toes. Pull the toes toward your body until you feel tension in the arch of your foot. Hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds, then repeat on the opposite side. Another easy way to stretch your arch is to put a towel on the floor, curl your toes around it and pull it toward your body.




Stretching Exercises

Start in an L-Sit position. (If you?re hips and hamstrings are tight sit up on a box or phone book to be able to achieve a tall back position. You can even sit on a box with your back supported against a wall!) Keeping the legs straight, but not locked, reach both heels out away from your body to ?Flex? the ankles. Try to avoid pulling back with the toes to flex. Keep the toes relaxed and lead from the heel to hinge the foot into the flexed position. Hold the flexed foot and breathe. Take 3-5 breaths and see if you can reach farther through the heel to deepen the flex on each exhale. To transition to the pointed position, begin by pointing the foot to move the ankles as far as possible in the other direction. Once the ankles have reached their endpoint, use the muscles along the sole of the foot to point the toes. Inhale to continue lengthening out through the top of the foot, exhale to deepen the contraction under the sole of the foot to point the toes. Take 3-5 breaths. Then release the toes, and begin reaching out through the heel to hinge the ankle into the flexed position to repeat the exercise. Continue to flex and the point for 5-10 repetitions.